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We attempt to recreate Busta's Arab Money, (perhaps just a bit tounge-in-cheek), as if it were presented by a Middle Eastern rapper with the same slightly-warped fascination with a similarly glorified, but not entirely accurate, vision of urban American reality. Then we ask, "What if a Middle Eastern rapper released "Negro Money" with these lyrics?"

What If A Middle Eastern Rapper Released “Negro Money”

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Several times over the years, Marvel Comics published a standalone issue, under the “What If?” moniker, presenting the results of an alternate reality in the Marvel universe. Questions like “What If Spider-Man Had Joined The Fantastic Four?”, or “What if Wolverine Had Killed The Hulk?” were answered with the same expert craftsmanship as the rest of the legendary Marvel comics. It is in this spirit that Birthplace Magazine presents our own version of these classic comics, asking the hypothetical NY rap-related questions that allow you, the reader, to weigh in and answer “what if…?”

What If? #001 – What If A Middle Eastern Rapper Released “Negro Money”

Busta Rhymes’ song Arab Money is receiving heavy criticism from those who would say the depictions therein are borderline racist, with actual Arab Americans citing “the ignorant and fake-Arabic chorus, the ignorant mispronunciation of ‘Arab’ and ‘the stereotypical depiction of Arab culture, with the focus on some of the extreme opulence you might see in a Dubai or a few other places.”

Many others agree, some are fans letting Busta know some rules, perceived insensitivities within the song, and as with other controversial hip-hop songs, corporations are not being completely entertained. Despite some who suggest this is much ado about nothing, and Busta’s own pseudo-explanation, some wonder what this kind of song might have looked like if coming the other way around, and what the resulting response might have been.

So, with this in mind, we attempt to recreate the song, (perhaps just a bit tounge-in-cheek), as if it were presented by a Middle Eastern rapper with the same slightly-warped fascination with a similarly glorified, but not entirely accurate, vision of urban American reality. And so, we ask:

What if a Middle Eastern rapper released “Negro Money” with the following lyrics?

Now I heard what Busta Rhymes and what Ron Browz said / but me I got
Negro women and Negro bread
I got crack selling money in the projects playin’ dice
Sean John shorts, doo-rag, butterfly knife
Conflict diamonds make this Arab wanna laugh at ya
Al Qaeda spent 20 million to fund civil wars in Africa
So I step up in da club with skinny jeans full of the chronics
And make the people wanna sing the hook in ebonics!

YoDunSonnNahMeanNahmSayin
AyoOverHurrAightWordWasGoodie
We gettin Negro Money
We gettin Negro Money

WaddapKidYaErrrdFeelMehBeeyotchHoe
BomDigiBomDiDangDiDangGo
We gettin Negro Money
We gettin Negro Money

Hourly Hotels, stolen cars, bootleg movies
Sick big ass, hair weave, baby mama hootchies
Women walkin’ around while security eating watermelons
Club on fire now, bar is all full of felons
Sittin in casinos while I’m gamblin’ with Biggie
Money so long watch me purchase Brooklyn from the City
Ya already know I got the Middle East happenin’
So I bust ya ass like cops do to Black Americans

YoDunSonnNahMeanNahmSayin
AyoOverHurrAightWordWasGoodie
We gettin Negro Money
We gettin Negro Money

WaddapKidYaErrrdFeelMehBeeyotchHoe
BomDigiBomDiDangDiDangGo
We gettin Negro Money
We gettin Negro Money

Heyyy!!
See now I take trips to Compton, Gully! Wow!
Used to herd sheep, counting Negro money now
My dark arab skin, arab beard was making me say
“I might look out of place” but people just thought I was Freeway
I really don’t care ’bout black folk, cuz I’m still really, really rich like
Commander in Chief President George Walker Bush
But they still respect the value of my work in the glorious ghettos of
New York, New Orleans, L.A., Chicago!!

YoDunSonnNahMeanNahmSayin
AyoOverHurrAightWordWasGoodie
We gettin Negro Money
We gettin Negro Money

WaddapKidYaErrrdFeelMehBeeyotchHoe
BomDigiBomDiDangDiDangGo
We gettin Negro Money
We gettin Negro Money

…Thoughts?

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4 comments

  1. This debate is going too far. The song would not fly because it’s outright derogatory and debases “negroes”. Negro includes all brown people of African decent not just black americans. Busta was not bashing arabs (a particular group of people from the middle east) but this hypothetical song does just that in every line. Pepole get a grip!

  2. "YoDunSonnNahMeanNahmSayin
    AyoOverHurrAightWordWasGoodie
    We gettin Negro Money
    We gettin Negro Money

    WaddapKidYaErrrdFeelMehBeeyotchHoe
    BomDigiBomDiDangDiDangGo
    We gettin Negro Money
    We gettin Negro Money"

    priceless. :D

  3. Touche, but the debate over the lyrics of this song is a debate unto itself.

  4. Enough people found malice to warrant speaking on it. And being of Arab decent or of Muslim faith, does not automatically mean that what you are doing is going to be universally accepted by other Arabs or Muslims. Plenty of African-American people disapprove of the "N" word, and do not feel that the other African-Americans use it, dictate its acceptance. Based on some of the comments and aftermath, it appears as if Busta and those associated realize that some people had valid complaints. I don't expect hip-hop to be politically correct etc., but part of what Birthplace Magazine is trying to do, is to call attention to a rebirth of hip-hop where ignorance and vapid content will hopefully be the exception, and no longer the rule, so when a song comes along like this, from a NY artist, we will hopefully spark a similar debate every time.

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